Style Of The Stars: Héloïse Letissier, Christine and Chris

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About eight years ago, Héloïse Letissier, Christine and the Queens frontwoman,  invented Christine, a persona “inspired by the idea that everyone could have a Christine inside to wake.” Christine and the Queens’s debut, Chaleur humaine, was a work on reinvention that dealt with depression, queer identity, and susceptibility.  All of these deep transformations and a strong confidence to share her feelings through her music reflected in the way she expressed herself via fashion as well. With the release of her new single and album earlier this year, we see Christine making space for a new persona named Chris (also the title of her new album). Instead of Christine, now she prefers to be called Chris, in her own words, “My femininity is more comfortable when I go through a macho structure.” From her debut in 2014 until now, she had hair down to her shoulders, which she chopped to become Christine. Now, as Chris, she has a pixie haircut. Hair for her is about exposing or protecting herself from the world – she’s slowly throwing herself into the world without shields. Her body also went through a visible change; after the intense dancing required by her career, she became more athletic and muscular. But if one thing only intensifies, it is her desire to “be a macho rock star who is feminine. A rough sailor who sings softly.” Letissier is already a style icon in her country, France, and she’s been gaining more and more attention in America. For her tour she had Kris Van Assche hand-make a Dior Homme suit for her, for example. As the owner of a strong personality and attitude, Letissier’s ideas and identity have everything to do with the way she chooses to dress.

She doesn’t have a known beauty routine; Letissier actually affirms that she has worn less makeup over the years—as another way to expose herself without “protections.” The singer’s main motif is that she “was not comfortable with femininity as it was,” and because of that she created for herself the femininity she wanted to see and be—her own idea of femininity and masculinity where she could comfortably find her style. It’s important to note that she’s not trying to “be a man” or dress like one, she’s simply playing with fashion, beauty, and her way to express her identity as a woman.

Letissier is a gender nonconformist, meaning she believes in gender fluidity and in “transgressing” fashion norms of male and female clothing. As a pop genre singer, she fights the stage sexualization and popstar nudity by opting to wear suits on stage. She refused to pose naked when asked by Karl Lagerfeld, for example. Touching very current issues and trying to accommodate fashion under new identities and fluidity, Letissier’s style is a good inspiration to every woman and man who wants to break the gender rules in fashion, or simply would like to incorporate stylish modern outfits into their everyday.

In terms of style, Letissier wears almost exclusively suits. Her wardrobe is formal, elegant, and modern. Her effortless sensuality comes from her impeccable street style, which always has an aura of magnetism that catches attention. Letissier has numerous looks with suits to inspire us. This yellow and mint printed blazer by Défilé Schiaparelli is a modern example of how to pair a fun and colorful blazer with classic garments. What turns this outfit modern is the footwear: borrowed from menswear in vinyl finish with a squared point. Another gorgeous outfit is this by Burberry; instead of a blazer she wears a silk striped jacket with a ruffled shirt. If these pieces are interesting enough for mixing romantic with athletic-wear, she finishes the look with urban garments: wide-legged trousers and heavy, industrial boots. As someone who suits up for the stage, Letissier’s stage outfits are worth copying from office hours to cocktails. Shimmering silver, gray with a basic white shirt, or vibrant red: her stage suits break the rule of what it means to look glamorous. Strong, confident woman need outfits that complement their style. Many women feel powerful wearing a suit, a blazer, or a jacket, and that’s how they best reveal their personality and talent. Even when opting for these garments, Letissier’s style is never boring or bland. She delivers a lively pop performance, remaining true to herself.

Her style is not only outstanding on stage, but also on the red carpet. Letissier’s red carpet outfits are always modern with a traditional finish that turns her looks into a balanced mix of boldness and sophistication. Wearing red leather rompers and a geometrical printed blouse, she mixes the prints with a variation of the same geometrical shapes in neutral colors that look modern but not edgy, allowing for a daring red leather garment to be the focus of the ensemble and making it into a clever red carpet outfit: modern and bold, but not edgy. Another modern concept (other than geometric prints) that Letissier likes to explore is asymmetry. In this outfit, we see classic trousers paired with an asymmetrical shirt. The open shirt showing the belly button creates a fun way to expose the body without focusing on the décolletage, as we normally see. But, if you want to borrow one outfit from Letissier, this outfit composed only of neutral colors won’t disappoint you. Wide trousers, white shirt, a leather jacket with caramel fur and brown boots is formal, elegant, and at the same time the hairstyle adds a modern touch that can easily be changed to give a different tone to the outfit. Urban power style ready-to-wear!

Letissier’s style inspirations are David Bowie and Madonna, both known for their chameleonic styles that remind us that the world is our stage. There’s no difference between showtime and Monday mornings. They’re always dressed as themselves but not like everybody else. However, Letissier’s style is mightier. It can be worn by anyone: it’s flawless, bare skin, and very tasteful. The unique thing that matters is the power of putting yourself in the world without anything to hide who you are. Fearless of your own choices, Letissier opts for clothes that highlight her best feature: which is herself. And, most interestingly of all, her outfits make great street style looks and workwear. To incorporate some items inspired by Letissier’s wardrobe, choose lace-up shoes ($600), a fitted shirt ($155), black pants ($100), and, of course, a great blazer like this by DKNY ($180). Fashion can help you express, reveal, and introduce ourselves according to our moods, occasions, and identities. Plural in style, identity, and extremely confident, Latisser, Christine, and Chris’s inspiration is only one: fashion is an extension to what you can be.